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Photo Gallery Update!

I finally editing my favorite photos from the trip and posted them. The dashcam video is coming soon! I went on a snowy mountain bike ride in Flagstaff yesterday too so I'll post some photos from that soon! Tips and more cool locations to see coming soon!

Phoenix to Fairbanks (and Back): Day 10

What a trip this has been so far! The first 5 days were absolutely incredible! Unfortunately, things didn't quite follow the plan after that... By the time I reached southern British Columbia, my sleeping pad was flat, I was out of cooking fuel, the temperature dropped below freezing, and many private gas stations were shut down for the winter already. Towns and other cars became increasingly rare sights. By the time I reached Yukon on the 6th night, I had decided not to spend any more time in Canada than I had to. I made excellent time that day so I decided to head to bed early and finish the remaining 16 hours in the next day. I got up at 5 AM and reached the capital, Whitehorse, by 10 AM where I changed my oil. Stopping only for gas and occasional pictures, I pushed on to Anchorage and arrived shortly before midnight.

My couchsurfing hosts are insanely amazing, kind, and hilarious! The last three days here have been rainy so I haven't managed to explore much. Today is still cloudy, but I'm taking the opportunity to see what I can! Wish me luck!

Phoenix to Fairbanks (and back): Day 4

A lot of people have been requesting pictures. I will upload edited versions later, but here are some temporary ones to keep you at bay. It's the end of Day 4 for my Phoenix to Fairbanks (and back) trip. I spend the first day driving to the coast and reached it just as the sun set on the Highway 1. I got up before sunrise the next morning and drove up the coast to San Francisco and spent some time at the Golden Gate Bridge and surrounding area. Then I drove up through central northern California until I reached my friend's place in southern Oregon and passed out for the night. Yesterday I woke up and drove to the Redwoods, drove through a tree, spent a little time at the beach, then quickly drove over to Crater Lake just in time for sunset pictures. Today, I woke up drove straight through Washington and made it to Canada with enough light to check out a really cool waterfall just off the coast.

Tomorrow, it's back on the road as I head to Anchorage, Alaska. I should be there by the night of the 7th.

Off to Alaska! See you in 24 days.

I've been planning this trip for months and it's almost here. Many people signed up and expressed interest, but it looks like it's just me. I get it; three weeks is a long time. I knew this was a possibility and I'm not turning back now. Before the sun rises tomorrow morning, I'll be on the road to Fairbanks, Alaska. The trip will take 24 days and I'll see amazing things on the way there and back! Your loss, suckas! ;D

The first 7 months of my new life and "Max Level Adventures"

The list that began it all.
The list that began it all.

It's been just over 7 months since I started the Facebook group. Holy shit. When I started the group on January 31st, I had tons of ideas! It only took two months to do things I thought it would take me a year to accomplish. I went skydiving, bungee jumping in California, explored Monument Valley, Antelope Canyon (pictured), competed in an obstacle course, and biked/hiked in places I'd never been before. Running out of ideas began to seem like a very real possibility, but it never happened. The ideas weren't always specific, but they didn't have to be. All I had to do was decide what activity I wanted to do and pick a location. Cliff jumping? Let's check out Fossil Creek. Hiking? Let's check out Flat Iron, Biking? Let's check out Sedona.

Many of my ideas came from word of mouth. I would tell someone about my adventures and they'd say, "oh, man, have you heard of ______?!" And most of the time, my answer was "no" or "yeah, but I haven't been there." They'd tell me enough to pique my interest and I'd add it to the list.

The solution was pretty simple; I just started planning adventures for myself.

As time passed, I realized I had become a little *too* inclusive. I found myself planning too many events for people that would cut trips short because they didn't take it seriously or came underprepared. Or they would bail entirely. It took me a while to make the change because I didn't want to exclude certain people for the behavior of others. The solution was pretty simple; I just started planning adventures for myself. Then it didn't matter if anyone showed up because I still got to do what I wanted.

I suspected that being more selfish and exclusive would result in reduced interest - and it did to an extent. The number of sign-ups decreased, but the turn-outs remained about the same. In hindsight I realize that I was creating more serious followers while reducing the source of my stress. I had solved my problem just by relentlessly pursuing my passion - which is what I had set out to do all along.

It cost me a few old hobbies and friendships to get here, but those sacrifices taught me the difference between happiness and complacency. I've never been more excited about my future.